Install Theme

crossconnectmag:

Lori Nix b. 1969 is a photographer from Brooklyn, NY who has been building detailed dioramas and then photographing them since the early 1990s, and whose work has been widely collected and exhibited internationally.

Nix considers herself a “faux landscape photographer,”and her work is influenced by extreme weather and disaster films. She works without digital manipulation, using miniatures and models to create surreal scenes and landscapes, building dioramas that range from 20 inches to six feet in diameter. They take several months to build, and two to three weeks to photograph, using a large format 8 × 10 film camera

via Wikipedia / photos Daily Mail

                                         :-)

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You see," he concluded, "if she was just anybody I could get over it, no matter how much I loved her. But she isn’t.

—    F. Scott Fitzgerald, Basil & Cleopatra (via fitzgeraldquotes)

(via wildhoon)

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cenchempics:

SEPARATION
While carrying out a liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane and a sample of lake water, Jennifer Apell, a graduate student at MIT, observed the formation of an emulsion in the sample, likely due to the presence of certain chemicals in the water. When she let the dichloromethane and water separate, air bubbles became trapped by the emulsion layer at the dichloromethane/water interface, creating the effect seen in this picture. Apell is studying the bioavailable concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated water bodies to assess their risk to living organisms.   
Credit: Submitted by Jennifer Apell (Enter our photo contest here.)

cenchempics:

SEPARATION

While carrying out a liquid-liquid extraction using dichloromethane and a sample of lake water, Jennifer Apell, a graduate student at MIT, observed the formation of an emulsion in the sample, likely due to the presence of certain chemicals in the water. When she let the dichloromethane and water separate, air bubbles became trapped by the emulsion layer at the dichloromethane/water interface, creating the effect seen in this picture. Apell is studying the bioavailable concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in contaminated water bodies to assess their risk to living organisms.  

Credit: Submitted by Jennifer Apell (Enter our photo contest here.)

(via artspotting)